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Just played a very comfortable round of a walking 9 hole golf today in 28degree weather. A wool cap and socks were a given, but, clothing that has not been mentioned that are a comfortable must; flannel lined slacks (and fleece-lined are eleven warmer) and a light-weight down-microtherm-vest over a microfleece hoodie....how one layers is their choice. Played my best round all season.....just tough to find balls in the leaf-filled rough this time of the year in northwestern Wisconsin.....used fluorescent orange balls and still lost one. All clothes were black or dark green.....was 26degrees when the round ended and was very warm.

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As golfers, we have to play in such a range of conditions that are unlikely to be experienced in other sports. This year, for example, I have played in temperatures ranging from -3 degrees C to 33 degrees C.

The main key to playing good golf in cold temperatures is to keep warm while maintaining a high level of mobility. When people say wear enough layers it can be misleading because wearing too many layers can hinder movement and decrease your ability to swing effectively. Personally, I find tight layers underneath my normal golf clothes to be better than wearing several jumpers. I would also advise the use of hand warmers to keep warm and I actually find that having warm hands improves my feel around the greens

Temperature also has a massive effect on distance. A ball travelling at the same speed in cold weather will not go as far as a ball travelling at the same speed in hot weather. However, in cold weather, the golfer will often be stiff and not able to swing at the same speed so it is usually advisable to take at least one extra club on shots in cold weather.

See: http://golfguides.info/best-golf-irons-for-mid-handicappers

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Good gracious man what were you talking about 40 degrees being "really cold"... hope you've become more aware and gotten some hair on you balls in these last 6 years.

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When bundling up, I also like to put on a puffy, down filled vest or even my UA Cold Weather vest. When worn together you get twice the warmth. These don't hinder or bind on the shoulders. A turtle neck or mock turtle also provide additional warmth for the neck.

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From October-March, we walk our hilly home course outside Phila (PA) which keeps us comfortable down to the high 30s/about 40 degree mark. We also use hot hands to keep the golf ball warm. Good quality 3-wheeled push carts do the job.

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Something I tried that seems to work in colder months in Tennessee. I have a pair of the over-sized mittens. I put a HotHands packet in each one (plenty of room). Keep my hands in there until ready to take a shot. After my shot, hands go back in and it is nice and toasty.

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Watch out for extra bounce on frozen greens. On the other hand, on really cold days, you can use the now frozen water hazards to bounce the ball up onto the green.

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play a very soft or womans golf ball cold weather seem to make these golf ball somewhat harder, more control less roll on your short game also insluated vest over your main torso = gives you more freedom to swing, play more of your 3 wood off tees winters here in w,v, can get a little windy, hope this helps some of you guys out there!

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Merina wool sweaters or vests. Old school but FAR more comfortable and way warmer than anything artificial. if you don't believe me ask anyone from Scotland where they play in the snow. Also you could ask a Ryder Cup player from the US as they freeze their KNOTS off when playing Europe who all wear merino.

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I love In Northwest Indiana, and we have a group that will play year round WP. I liked your comment about the golf carts, I walk 99% of my rounds. When your walking even mid 30’s don’t seem that bad.