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Completely agree with this article. As someone relatively new to the game I would love a quick 5 minute tip from a roaming coach.

And because I now know who he/she is then I would be more likely to ask for a 121 session.

Great idea.

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Michael, if your so concerned about everyones swing then you stand out there and give your advice for free. Unfortunately as a fellow pro I know I speak for my colleagues when I say pay us and we will help you. Nothing comes for free. I know a club champion who comes over the top severely and still shoots even par. If you think you can fix everyone then by all means have at it. I will still charge my hourly rate to stand out there in the elements and gladly fix or help anyone who wants it.

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Not really. Only if a person asked for help. Most people go to a driving range to get away and don't want to be bothered. I wouldn't want anyone standing over me and watching me.

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Being a golf instructor myself I agree with this and disagree with this. Not because of revenue for instructors because any instructor already knows that it's hard to just be able to make a living just teaching. Which is why many have to resort to doing something else around the course to pay the bills. I would disagree with this because I haven't met one high handicapper who would actually go for this. They already feel embarrassed and think they suck. To have someone there just reinforcing that would be doubly as embarrassing. This could lead to them not coming back to the facility or giving up the game entirely. Most of them just want the satisfaction of hitting a ball well on their own even if it takes an entire bucket of balls to do so. It's a shame that rounds have to take so long because people stuggle to play this great game, but it would be way more beneficial if everyone had to take a quick lesson on Pace of play. They may find that the game is more enjoyable if it doesn't take all day no matter how they play and might even try harder to get better knowing they don't have time to just keep dropping another ball and disregarding their last bad shot.

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I’ve played golf for almost 30 years. I’ve shaved 20 stokes off in that amount of time. However I play at the same pace. Fast. People in general are so slow!

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All pros can haves you hitting decently on the range, but to transfer that knowledge to the course is another thing...totally. And, I'm not necessarily trying to improve as much as loosen up..being 64, that means a lot

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Have you ever thought that it might be relaxing to unwind and smash a few balls down the range? You don't necessarily go to improve every time, it would become a chore for many people.

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It's a good idea as long as there is a protocol for soliciting these quick tips. Personally, my range sessions are always focused. I film my sessions and then work with my pro and his methodology on what to improve next. I am not interested nor welcome any advice other than my pro's. If I have a bad session, I know why, know the drills to fix it, and want to be left alone. As long as these floating pros have a non invasive protocol at the range, I agree it may be helpful to most.

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I don't know how many times I've been on the driving range practicing and when I hit up terrible shot asking myself what I did wrong if there was somebody there to at least give me some advice on what I was doing wrong that would be great! I love the idea of short little lesson just something to straighten you out at the present time

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Support the PRO!
They got eat too!

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I am totally in agreement with this idea. Offering a quick tip or mini lesson by one of the golf course pros would not only be of personal benefit but generate loyalty to the course. With courses closing everyday due to lack of interest among the younger generation, this personal attention may well help build new golfing guests and improve upon slow play usually attributed to poor play.

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How can you agree with this article as a golfers? Unless you are not a true golfer or are very cheap! No golfer would ever want someone standing there telling them basically that they suck and can't play this sport. I know many people with bad swings and can play at a very high level. As an instructor if you ever told them to change something they would just look at you and laugh. Pros don't need to work for free, there isn't enough time in the day to work a paying job and one that doesn't no matter how much they enjoy teaching. Support the course and pros don't turn them into dancing monkies just because you want a faster round of golf.

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This is one of the dumbest articles on golf I’ve personally ever read.
ALWAYS, in every sport, PRACTICE MAKES YOU BETTER! Even developing a bad swing will improve ball striking and a golf score.
Should a bowler always have an instructor available? A tennis player? A basketball player?
If a player intends to turn professional, yes work regularly with an instructor. However, to go have fun with friends or just to ‘not be embarrassed’ with business associates practice of any kind is helpful. I always suggest any golfer ocassionallly get some swing analysis, but to say working alone is harmful is not helpful.
Golf ranges need help from your publication, what in the world is your motive to discourage anyone from trying to become better.

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Practicing over and over bad shots and adjusting to try to fix them without knowing what you're doing is just a very stupid idea. I so appreciate it when I get just a Little Help from a pro. And then can work on the right thing. Friends since I've seen people on the driving range coming way over the top farther and farther trying to make the ball go more left and all they do is make a go more right. If it just had someone to tell them come from inside out they could have a really good practice instead of a failure.