Midwest golfers and operators cope with statewide course suspensions as springtime arrives

Masters week is usually a celebratory time for Midwest golfers. But in fanatic golf states like Wisconsin and Michigan, courses remain closed.

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I know what it's like to be a golf-starved Midwesterner.

It's not fun feeling like a caged animal all winter. Watching pro golf visit Hawaii, California and Florida only fuels the jealousy.

The Masters is often a week of joy up north, where temperatures begin to warm and golf courses open. But in 2020, The COVID-19 outbreak has put a stop to those plans in many states where governor mandates have banned golf until the outbreak passes its peak.

When Minnesota Governor Tim Walz extended the state's mandate closing courses Wednesday through May 4, it felt like a gut punch to many, including Tim Matsche, the general manager at Loggers Trail in Stillwater, Minn.

"A lot of people in the golf industry really thought the governor would allow us to open," he said. "Most courses saw that as a loss. We sure did. We were all optimistic on the staff. (The only saving grace is) The weather looks poor next week. We are prepared today to do whatever we need to do.”

While most warm weather states are continuing to allow playing the game with safety restrictions in place, the governors of Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin have shut down golf completely. On the East Coast, the golf industry in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania and New Jersey is also feeling the strain from government-mandated course closures. Maine is currently under the longest East Coast ban with no golf allowed until May 1, according to this report. New York courses were open, but a recent executive order April 9 closed them through April 29, according to WGRZ.com.

The mandates are closing an already small window of 6-7 months for northern golfers who want to tee it up and owners/operators who hope to make money while the sun shines. Losing too many good golf days is a heavy burden to bear. Matsche estimates his course has lost at least 2,000 rounds already this spring. One league has already canceled its season and asked for a refund.

"Every week we get pushed back, it is harder and harder to convince league and regular members that it (buying a membership) is worth it," he said.

Michigan in a tough spot

In Michigan, the issue has become divisive.

Detroit is currently a hotspot for the virus spread, which probably explains why Michigan's golf industry hasn't fought too hard publicly against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's ban. The Michigan Golf Alliance, a group of influential golf associations and organizations, sent a letter (see below) to Lansing earlier this week that said it "supports" the "Stay Home, Stay Safe" order, which was scheduled to end April 7 but was extended through April 30.

Kevin Helm, the executive director of the Michigan section of the PGA, which is part of the alliance, admittedly knows golf industry people on both sides of the closure issue.

"As a golf alliance, it is a tough position," he said. "We know how important it is for courses to be open in spring, but health and safety and what the governor is trying to do is important. We want to be part of the solution. We want golf to be considered to be one of the first ones (businesses) to reopen when the time is right."

He said he's been told that open courses in the neighboring states of Ohio and Indiana have a "parking lot full of Michigan license plates." Golf rounds in Indiana are up 34 percent from last year, according to GolfNow data. Toledo has plans announced Thursday to ban Michigan golfers from playing its area courses going forward, according to WTOL.

Social media is a popular spot for golfers to protest, including Mike DeVries, a prominent Michigan-based architect.

Two Michigan-based change.org petitions - here and here - have garnered fewer than 2,000 signatures. A group of West Michigan golfers called Good Friends Golf against Whitmer's actions - first reported by mlive.com - has taken the protest letter it sent to government officials off its website. At least two state representatives have appealed to the governor, according to the Detroit News.

These efforts are being heard but not garnering much sympathy from the state officials, at least according to this controversial tweet by Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, who stirred up racial undertones that have plagued metro Detroit since the 1960s riots.

Meanwhile, across Lake Michigan, Wisconsin course owners and operators feel like they're being singled out unfairly as well, considering walking, hiking and riding bikes outdoors, etc. is allowed during this time. Wisconsin's courses are closed through at least April 24.

"We're doing things that make us safer than other outdoor activities," Jeff Schwister, the executive director of the Golf Course Owners of Wisconsin told The Journal Times in Racine. "You go down to your local parks, state parks, things like that that are open, they can be quite crowded on the trails."

The Wisconsin State Golf Association has sent two letters to the governor asking to reverse the law, according to the newspaper. A change.org petition to open Wisconsin's golf courses has secured roughly 65,000 signatures. Creating some confusion is this story from the Wisconsin State Journal how one county sheriff is allowing golfers to play as long as they're dues paying members of the course.

"What our courses are doing is allowing their members to show up and walk and golf the course," Dunn County Sherrif Kevin Bygd told the newspaper April 2. "As far as I'm concerned, if they take online sales of yearly memberships, I don't see a violation."

A change.org petition to open Minnesota's courses has roughly 43,000 signatures. Originally, executive orders didn't allow staff to maintain the courses, which can devastate turf quality after just a few weeks, until that changed with the most recent update.

"Most courses were doing maintenance," admitted Matsche. "They felt like they had to."

In Illinois, courses are locked down until at least April 30, according to the Chicago Tribune, a ruling the four major local golf associations have supported, writing in a letter: "The leaders respect the decision of the Governor's Office and understand the gravity of the public health crisis we are facing. At this time, the allied associations will shift their efforts from advocating for golf courses to reopen to assisting our constituents in getting through these difficult times."

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Following state and county executive orders that closed many businesses, these destinations currently have the most public courses taking tee times.
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Jason Scott Deegan has reviewed more than 1,000 courses and golf destinations for some of the industry's biggest publications. His work has been honored by the Golf Writer's Association of America and the Michigan Press Association. Follow him on Instagram at @jasondeegangolfadvisor and Twitter at @WorldGolfer.
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Michigan golf courses in Washtenaw county following rules - social distancing and no carts except for handicapped . Courses in neighboring counties are allowing carts! Golf courses following rules losing business in a big way. Others warned but will not use rules. Some of these beautiful courses cannot survive if this continues!! HELP!!!

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Our governor Inslee in Washington is so far behind the ball, we have counties that are data shows on the down side and won’t let them make the decision to open up golf Coarse’s. It should be up to the counties not our governor! It’s so obvious golf Coarse’s are safer than most side walks, beaches and parks, but they’re open? I don’t get it! Vote Inslee out of office!

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EVERY golf course is closed in Canada. While I agree that this is terrible economically for golf course owners & their staff, so is the toll that COVID-19 is taking on the health and lives of people everywhere. I own a business that has taken a substantial hit. I have had to lay off employees and will have to endure the uncertainty of what normal will be much later (and worry if my business will be part of the 1 in 3 small businesses in Ontario that will not be able to re-open later). I would normally be out golfing today like millions of others. Instead, I am at home looking forward to the day I will be able to golf again. If I have to choose between possibly dying and golfing, my personal decision is easy. Did I mention that I am in a high risk group as I have diabetes? I respect everyone else's opinion, but common sense must prevail until the day we can play the game we all love again.

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So glad I live in Florida where we have common sense. One golfer per cart, don't touch the flag stick. No raking of the bunkers, not so much, but I can live with it. No clubhouse to get a drink to celebrate that great round of golf, but what the heck. We are in the sunshine enjoying what we do. It's going to be hard giving up the one person per cart. Really enjoying that.

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I'm in south Jersey where courses are closed. I am less than a half hour drive from Delaware where the courses are open, only problem is they ain't letting out of state people in. What a country!

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Shame Courses are close up North. This are different south of Mason Dixon. Alot of sanitizing, singles in carts, more walking, and practicing distancing... togos at turn, and solid pace of play.

Thought! What if, Tiger and Phil had Team's when they play... Team Tiger, Team Phil, and maybe Team PGA, LPGA, Senior Super Senior Teams. Pros Play their chosen Courses, we play ours to Raise Funds for Corona Virus Families, Courses Struggling and Covid -19 Research/Development. Sign up Sponsors, play against each other, have fun, raise $$$$$$$$, get some fresh air comrades, twitter, TicTok, SnapChat, YouTube your highlights... Score via GolfNow, Golf Genius.

Thoughts???

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New York ordered golf course workers stay home. It did not explicitly ban golfing. Most clubs took this as a “no access” order, however the Metropolitan Section - the ruling committee for local golf, issued a statement that clubs should OPEN their gates to their members for walking and golf according to safety procedures (one group of max 2 people per hole, only people from the same household may play together). Greens keepers must be freaking out - greens can be lost fast depending on weather. This could cost clubs MILLIONS in repairs, and could cause some courses to fail. The risk of having a handful of workers maintaining crucial areas early in the morning on an empty course is ZERO. The risk of play separated by hundreds of yards is ZERO. The politics of class warfare is always attractive. Rich white folks shouldn’t be allowed to play while poor people suffer. That is the only message forcing closures and disallowing maintenance work sends. I see town workers out on the roads. No layoffs or furloughs for the public unions. Funny that,

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In Wis. they allowed hunting and fishing to continue so DNR did not have to make refunds of License money. When sitting in a boat, you definitely can not maintain the 6 ft. distance requirement any different than being on a golf course.

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One one hand, it's the government officials opening to succor their lust for use of power.
Doubt me? Here in NM, the Chicken Little gov decided TENNIS is OK as well as the dog walkers, joggers, hikers, etc. BUTT a Big NO for golfers. IF you believe there is logical congruence between tennis and golf as far as 'contact' and 'social distancing', sports is just not your thing. NO ONE touches my ball(s) on the golf course, but in tennis, ALL the balls get touched by EVERYONE. Little minds make their way to heads of states.

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Amen brother. Up here in Minnesota we have the same challenge asthis article states. Really no reason not to open the courses. Yes the virus is serious but so is the economy.

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I completely agree with the ban. Most golfers playing during the week are seniors and are in the high risk category. Waiting a few weeks won't kill you...playing now may!

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Midwest golfers and operators cope with statewide course suspensions as springtime arrives