Srixon goes retro with new two-tone Q-Star Tour DIVIDE golf ball

Will golfers embrace a color pattern originally used by Ping that went extinct decades ago?

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PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. - I freaked out the first time I stood over Srixon's new two-tone Q-Star Tour DIVIDE golf ball.

I'm blaming the vibrant yellow-and-red color combination for the rocket wedge I bladed over the green at the grand opening of The Hay, the new short course by Tiger Woods' TGR Design at Pebble Beach. I tried the ball for one more hole before I gave up, putting trusty mr. white Titleist Pro V1x back in play.

Everything in life deserves a second chance, right? Fast forward a couple weeks, I teed up the DIVIDE at my local muni where I knew I would feel more comfortable about my game. It performed beyond expectations. I played well and let a playing partner try it on no. 18. He proceeded to hit the longest drive my buddies and I have ever seen on that hole after dozens of rounds.

I'm a fan of using yellow golf balls, so making the jump to a DIVIDE won't be an issue for me, but will purists follow suit?

The two-toned advantage

Srixon Q-Star Tour DIVIDE golf ball is two-toned to help golfers line up putts and see their ball spin.

When I first saw the ball, I assumed it was the first of its kind. Wrong. Ping made two-toned balls in the 1980s that apparently have become a sort of cult classic for collectors. This ebay listing is selling old Ping balls from 99 cents to $799! Many of the old Pings were at least white on one side. The DIVIDE takes the concept to the next level with its matte look.

Its new thermoplastic urethane cover has been infused with bright pigments rather than being painted on. The 50/50 Matte Urethane Cover still provides the same tour-level spin and stopping power as the original Q-STAR Tour ball.

The advantage of the DIVIDE is two-fold. First, it's easier to line up putts using the point where the colors converge as an aiming line. Second, when golfers strike the ball, the rotating colors create a "strobe" effect that allows them to see the ball spin.

It's actually quite entertaining to watch how the ball reacts off the club face, both off the tee and even for shorter pitches and chips. I could tell right away if I hit a good drive based on the way my ball looked mid-flight. The side-spin of slices was evident immediately.

I had no problem spinning the ball out of the bunkers. It performed with a good balance of distance and feel. I'm no traditionalist, so I'm willing to be the outlier in my foursome and continue to use such a unique looking ball. The question for Srixon is: Will you?

Srixon's Q-Star Tour DIVIDE golf ball retails for $32.99 a dozen at GolfBalls.com.

(Editor's Note: GolfPass may earn a commission on certain purchases made via links posted in our articles. GolfPass does not receive compensation for product reviews.)

Have you used a two-tone ball in the past and would you do so again? Let us know in the comments.

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Jason Scott Deegan has reviewed more than 1,000 courses and golf destinations for some of the industry's biggest publications. His work has been honored by the Golf Writer's Association of America and the Michigan Press Association. Follow him on Instagram at @jasondeegangolfadvisor and Twitter at @WorldGolfer.
3 Comments
Commented on

I like divide golf ball.

Commented on

I like divide golf ball.

Commented on

Love the regular Q Star Tour, will certainly put this one in play. Still have one old PING dual color in the collection.

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Srixon goes retro with new two-tone Q-Star Tour DIVIDE golf ball